Canon EOS 250D UK Review: A solid bet

Canon EOS 250D UK Review: A solid bet

So the EOS 250D is a promising looking bit of kit. It sits almost exactly in the middle of Canon’s consumer range, but not bursting with expensive high-end features like the EOS 90D.

The question – is it capable enough to keep ambitious beginners happy, or does it sacrifice too much performance and too many features on the altar of budget-consciousness?


EOS 250D Body + Canon EF-S 18-55mm f/4-5.6 IS STM Lens - Black + Sandisk 64G Memory Card
amazon uk

The spec sheet makes for promising reading. Images are high resolution at 24.1 megapixels, courtesy of its APS-C sensor, with a maximum ISO of 51,200. At the heart of the EOS 250D is Canon’s DIGIC 8 – the same sensor as you’ll find in the EOS R and EOS 90D, among others. It offers enough oomph to allow the 250D to shoot 5fps in its fastest continuous mode, as well as providing for 4K video shooting at 25fps. You also get Canon’s dual-pixel CMOS autofocus, which allows for autofocus to be performed on the sensor itself, theoretically allowing faster autofocus in live view and movie modes.

A key differentiator between this and mirrorless cameras is the optical viewfinder, allowing photographers a direct view through the camera’s lens – and which doesn’t drain the battery every time you compose an image. That allows Canon to claim an impressive battery life of 1,070 images – significantly more than any mirrorless camera we can think of. You can still shoot the EOS 250D in live view mode, of course, and to that end there’s a 3in, pivoting touchscreen with 1,040,000 pixels. The EOS 250D uses Canon’s dual-pixel technology to allow autofocus to be performed on the sensor itself, leading to – theoretically – fasterand more accurate autofocus in live view./canon_eos_250d

 

Features and design

The EOS 250D is small – just 122mm wide, and it’s light. So light, in fact, that Canon is able to slap the bold claim on the box that this is the world’s lightest DSLR with a moveable screen. Before you add a lens, you’re looking at just 449g. This doesn’t quite put the 250D into mirrorless territory – but it does make the 250D utterly manageable for a day’s sightseeing, for example. Despite its whittled-down dimensions, one of the traditional strengths of the DSLR – excellent ergonomics – are preserved. The grip on the right hand side of the camera is deep and comfortable and the camera feels well balanced.

Body controls are, largely, present and correct, with a few sacrifices made to keep the EOS 250D’s dimensions in check. The autofocus point and autoexposure lock buttons are stacked on top of each other a little awkwardly on the back of the camera, and the camera’s buttons are almost universally titchy, which will make them tricky to hit if you’re trying to make manual adjustments while wearing gloves. Overall usability is good, though. The click wheel behind the shutter release is knurled and moves with a solid click; while it’s the only settings dial on the camera, Canon has made the Av button a bit bigger and easier to hit, allowing manual photographers a relatively easy time.

The monitor on the back is the only way to see how the EOS 250D is set up – you’ll need to get the Canon EOS 77D if you want a secondary LCD screen with shooting data. Luckily, it’s a good ‘un: 3in diagonally with 1,040,000 pixels. It’s – natch – a touchscreen, and while Canon’s in-camera menu system hasn’t changed significantly in about a decade, it held up to the vagaries of our fat fingers pretty well – we found getting around with either the jog dials, D-pad on the back or the touchscreen intuitive, fast and accurate. For beginners, it’s pleasing to see Canon’s excellent guided menu systems available as default. Flick to Av mode, for example, and the back of the camera will give you a quick appraisal of what different aperture settings mean. You also get plain-English warnings if you’re about to shoot over or under exposures. It makes the EOS 250D a very accessible camera for those who have never attempted to grapple with photography’s more technical points. Once you’re cooking on gas, you can choose to use Canon’s standard menu system, seen on this and every other Canon camera up to its flagship pro models.

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